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IGCSE Accounting Online Course CAIE

Start Date

Anytime

Enrolment Fee

£495

 Add IGCSE10 at checkout for 10% Discount off Multiple IGCSE courses

PayPal Acceptance Mark

Support

Up to 2 years

Study

Anywhere

Qualification

IGCSE

Fast Track

Available

IGCSE Accounting CAIE Online Course

IGCSE Accounting Online Course CAIE

Start Date

Enrolment Fee

Anytime

£495

PayPal Acceptance Mark

Support

Up to 2 years

Study

Anywhere

Qualification

IGCSE

Fast Track

Available

This IGCSE Accounting CAIE Online Course will introduce learners to the theory and concepts of accounting including the ways in which accounting is used in a variety of modern economic business contexts.

Learners will concentrate on the skills of recording, reporting, presenting and interpreting financial information; these will form an ideal foundation for further study, and for future career within the profession. The syllabus is structured so that learners attain both practical skills and theoretical knowledge.

What can I do with IGCSE Accounting?

The IGCSE Accounting course gives students a solid foundation for further study. Students who achieve grades 9-4 are well prepared to follow a wide range of courses including AS and A’ Level Accounting.

Cambridge IGCSEs are accepted by leading Universities and employers around the works as evidence of academic achievement. Many Universities require a combination of AS & A’ Levels and IGCSEs or equivalent to meet their entry requirements.

Previous Knowledge Required

There are no previous entry requirements for this course, however students are expected to have a reasonable standard of literacy. 

You have the freedom to start the course at any time and continue your studies at your own pace for a period of up to 24 months from initial registration with the full support of your Tutor.

Syllabus

The IGCSE Accounting Online Course has seven modules you will need to cover.

Awarding Body: Cambridge

IGCSE Accounting CAIE: 0452 (A*-G)
IGCSE Accounting CAIE: 0985 (9-1)

IGCSE Modules

The purpose of accounting

  • understand and explain the difference between book-keeping and accounting
  • state the purposes of measuring business profit and loss
  • explain the role of accounting in providing information for monitoring progress and decision-making

The accounting equation

  • explain the meaning of assets, liabilities and owner’s equity
  • explain and apply the accounting equation.

The double entry system of book-keeping

  • outline the double entry system of book-keeping
  • process accounting data using the double entry system
  • prepare ledger accounts
  • post transactions to the ledger accounts
  • balance ledger accounts as required and make transfers to financial statements
  • interpret ledger accounts and their balances
  • recognise the division of the ledger into the sales ledger, the purchases ledger and the nominal (general) ledger

Business documents

  • recognise and understand the following business documents: invoice, debit note, credit note, statement of account, cheque, receipt
  • complete pro-forma business documents
  • understand the use of business documents as sources of information: invoice, credit note, cheque counterfoil, paying-in slip, receipt, bank statement.

Books of prime entry

  • explain the advantage of using various books of prime entry
  • explain the use of and process accounting data in the books of prime entry: cash book, petty cash book, sales journal, purchases journal, sales returns journal, purchases returns journal and the general journal
  • post the ledger entries from the books of prime entry
  • distinguish between and account for trade discount and cash discounts
  • explain the dual function of the cash book as a book of prime entry and as a ledger account for bank and cash
  • explain the use of and record payments and receipts made by bank transfers and other electronic means
  • explain and apply the imprest system of petty cash.

The trial balance

  • understand that a trial balance is a statement of ledger balances on a particular date
  • outline the uses and limitations of a trial balance
  • prepare a trial balance from a given list of balances and amend a trial balance which contains errors
  • identify and explain those errors which do not affect the trial balance: commission, compensating, complete reversal, omission, original entry, principle.

Correction of errors

  • correct errors by means of journal entries
  • explain the use of a suspense account as a temporary measure to balance the trial balance
  • correct errors by means of suspense accounts
  • adjust a profit or loss for an accounting period after the correction of errors
  • understand the effect of correction of errors on a statement of financial position.

Bank reconciliation

  • understand the use and purpose of a bank statement
  • update the cash book for bank charges, bank interest paid and received, correction of errors, credit transfers, direct debits, dividends, and standing orders
  • understand the purpose of and prepare a bank reconciliation statement to include bank errors, uncredited deposits and unpresented cheques.

Control accounts

  • understand the purposes of purchases ledger and sales ledger control accounts
  • identify the books of prime entry as sources of information for the control account entries
  • prepare purchases ledger and sales ledger control accounts to include credit purchases and sales, receipts and payments, cash discounts, returns, irrecoverable debts, dishonoured cheques, interest on overdue accounts, contra entries, refunds, opening and closing balances (debit and credit within each account).

Capital and revenue expenditure and receipts

  • distinguish between and account for capital expenditure and revenue expenditure
  • distinguish between and account for capital receipts and revenue receipts
  • calculate and comment on the effect on profit of incorrect treatment
  • calculate and comment on the effect on asset valuations of incorrect treatment.

Accounting for depreciation and disposal of non-current assets

  • define depreciation
  • explain the reasons for accounting for depreciation
  • name and describe the straight-line, reducing balance and revaluation methods of depreciation
  • prepare ledger accounts and journal entries for the provision of depreciation
  • prepare ledger accounts and journal entries to record the sale of non-current assets, including the use of disposal accounts.

Other payables and other receivables

  • recognise the importance of matching costs and revenues
  • prepare ledger accounts and journal entries to record accrued and prepaid expenses
  • prepare ledger accounts and journal entries to record accrued and prepaid incomes.

Irrecoverable debts and provision for doubtful debts

  • understand the meaning of irrecoverable debts and recovery of debts written off
  • prepare ledger accounts and journal entries to record irrecoverable debts
  • prepare ledger accounts and journal entries to record recovery of debts written off
  • explain the reasons for maintaining a provision for doubtful debts
  • prepare ledger accounts and journal entries to record the creation of, and adjustments to, a provision for doubtful debts.

Valuation of inventory

  • understand the basis of the valuation of inventory at the lower of cost and net realisable value
  • prepare simple inventory valuation statements
  • recognise the importance of valuation of inventory and the effect of an incorrect valuation of inventory on gross profit, profit for the year, equity and asset valuation.

Sole traders

  • explain the advantages and disadvantages of operating as a sole trader
  • explain the importance of preparing income statements and statements of financial position
  • explain the difference between a trading business and a service business
  • prepare income statements for trading businesses and for service businesses
  • understand that statements of financial position record assets and liabilities on a specified date
  • recognise and define the content of a statement of financial position: non-current assets, intangible assets, current assets, current liabilities, non-current liabilities and capital
  • understand the inter-relationship of items in a statement of financial position
  • prepare statements of financial position for trading businesses and service businesses
  • make adjustments for provision for depreciation using the straight line, reducing balance and revaluation methods
  • make adjustments for accrued and prepaid expenses and accrued and prepaid income
  • make adjustments for irrecoverable debts and provisions for doubtful debts
  • make adjustments for goods taken by the owner for own use.

Partnerships

  • explain the advantages and disadvantages of forming a partnership
  • outline the importance and contents of a partnership agreement
  • explain the purpose of an appropriation account
  • prepare income statements, appropriation accounts and statements of financial position
  • record interest on partners’ loans, interest on capital, interest on drawings, partners’ salaries and the division of the balance of profit or loss
  • make adjustments to financial statements
  • explain the uses of and differences between capital and current accounts
  • draw up partners’ capital and current accounts in ledger account form and as part of a statement of financial position.

Limited companies

  • explain the advantages and disadvantages of operating as a limited company
  • understand the meaning of the term limited liability
  • understand the meaning of the term equity
  • understand the capital structure of a limited company comprising preference share capital, ordinary share capital, general reserve and retained earnings
  • understand and distinguish between issued, called-up and paid-up share capital
  • understand and distinguish between share capital (preference shares and ordinary shares) and loan capital (debentures)
  • prepare income statements, statements of changes in equity and statements of financial position
  • make adjustments to financial statements.

Clubs and societies

  • distinguish between receipts and payments accounts and income and expenditure accounts
  • prepare receipts and payments accounts
  • prepare accounts for revenue-generating activities, e.g. refreshments, subscriptions
  • prepare income and expenditure accounts and statements of financial position
  • make adjustments to financial statements
  • define and calculate the accumulated fund.

Manufacturing accounts

  • distinguish between direct and indirect costs
  • understand direct material, direct labour, prime cost and factory overheads
  • understand and make adjustments for work in progress
  • calculate factory cost of production
  • prepare manufacturing accounts, income statements and statements of financial position
  • make adjustments to financial statements 

Incomplete records

  • explain the disadvantages of not maintaining a full set of accounting records
  • prepare opening and closing statements of affairs
  • calculate profit or loss for the year from changes in capital over time
  • calculate sales, purchases, gross profit, trade receivables and trade payables and other figures from incomplete information
  • prepare income statements and statements of financial position from incomplete records
  • make adjustments to financial statements
  • apply the techniques of mark-up, margin and inventory turnover to arrive at missing figures.

Calculation and understanding of accounting ratios

  • Gross margin
  • Profit margin
  • Return on capital employed (ROCE)
  • Current ratio
  • Liquid (acid test) ratio
  • Rate of inventory turnover (times)
  • Trade receivables turnover (days)
  • Trade payables turnover (days)

Interpretation of accounting ratios

  • prepare and comment on simple statements showing comparison of results for different years
  • make recommendations and suggestions for improving profitability and working capital
  • understand the significance of the difference between the gross margin and the profit margin as an indicator of a business’s efficiency
  • explain the relationship of gross profit and profit for the year to the valuation of inventory, rate of inventory turnover, revenue, expenses, and equity.

Inter-firm comparison

  • understand the problems of inter-firm comparison
  • apply accounting ratios to inter-firm comparison

Interested parties

  • owners
  • managers
  • trade payables
  • banks
  • investors
  • club members
  • other interested parties such as governments, tax authorities, etc.

Limitations of accounting statements

  • historic cost
  • difficulties of definition
  • non-financial aspects

Accounting principles

  • matching
  • business entity
  • consistency
  • duality
  • going concern
  • historic cost
  • materiality
  • money measurement
  • prudence
  • realisation

Accounting policies

  • comparability
  • relevance
  • reliability
  • understandability

Assessments

Students will be required to arrange and pay for their examinations at a CAIE approved centre. We can provide an extensive list of these centres for you.

IGCSE Exams
There are two exams for the full IGCSE qualification. The length of each exam is as follows:

Paper 1 – 1 hour 30 min
Paper 2 – 1 hour 45 min

Paper 1 Paper 1 IGCSE Qualification

International GCSE Accounting Online Course Outcome

On successful completion of all your exams for the International GCSE Accounting Online Course, you will be awarded the following qualification:

International GCSE Accounting with CAIE

For more information on CAIE, please click here.

Request a Prospectus

 

Enrolment Fees

Our Enrolment fee for this course is noted at the top of this page where you can enrol directly onto the course.  This fee includes access to your course including tutor support for 2 years.

Our enrolment fee includes:

  • All study materials covering the full specification
  • Full support where you can also message your tutor as many times as you need to
  • Access to our online Library with a full range of eBooks
  • Reference
  • Assignment marking and feedback
  • Marked and graded practise examination papers
  • Eligibility for a Totum Card if you reside within the UK
  • Fast Track IGCSE if required and flexible learning from home 24/7.

The only other fee you will need to pay is for your exams which is due approximately six months prior and this will be paid directly to the exam centre.

FAQs

You can enrol online right now by Card or PayPal (Visa, Mastercard, Maestro and American Express). Alternatively, we also accept BACS transfer or we can send you a payment link.

Yes the IGCSE will be an online course.  You will be able to access everything via our online portal.

With our courses, we have learners from all over the world enrolled.  Therefore, if we restricted your learning to certain times, not everyone would be available.  All our courses are accessible 24/7 via our online secure portal.  Any videos on your portal would be pre-recorded meaning you can work through your course at your own pace.

By opting for our International GCSE, you can study the course from anywhere and exam centres are located all over the world including the UK.

You will be provided with eBooks for this course. If you want to purchase physical books in addition, then we can provide you with the book ISBN numbers.

The Guided learning hours for the IGCSE is 130.

These figures are for guidance only. The number of hours needed to gain the qualification may vary depending on your previous experience of the subject.

The IGCSE is an international alternative to the GCSE and as the subjects are normally exam based only, make them ideal for students who are unable to attend a local school or college. This means there is no need to carry out science practical exams or find a school that will mark and authenticate your coursework.

IGCSEs are internationally recognised and as well as being available in the UK, are also available worldwide. They are recognised by leading universities and employers worldwide, and are an international passport to progression and success.

We want exams to be as competitively priced for our learners as possible and therefore that is why we direct them to the examination centres rather than charge upfront fees.